Creating places we care about

You’ll notice certain signs when people at your company stop caring.

They might be physical things. Torn seats in the cafeteria that never seem to get fixed. The receptionist desk that’s still there, empty, long after they laid off the receptionist.

Or the signs might be subtler. The routine silence and lack of eye contact in the crowded elevators. The insidious acceptance of bureaucracy and waste because, well, that’s just the way things are around here.

But take heart. Even if you recognize these signs, there’s still something you can do.

“Entropy made visible”

What’s happened to companies is what has happened to many urban and suburban areas. James Kunstler, who authored a history of American suburbia and urban development, described the consequences as “entropy made visible.” He points out the block-long, windowless civic building. The too-wide street devoid of pedestrians. The gray school surrounded by barbed wire and a lone shrub. In his TED talk, he notes how, historically, creating places people cared about was made possible by a culture of civic design – a body of knowledge, methods, skills, and principles that “we threw in the garbage when…we decided we didn’t need that any more.”

“When you degrade the public realm, you will automatically degrade the quality of your civic life and the character of all the enactments of your public life and communal life that take place there…

We can’t overestimate the amount of despair we are generating with places like this…Places that people don’t want to be in. Places that are not worth caring about.”

And the same is true for our corporations. We discarded some of the age-old principles of what motivates and engages people. Somewhere along the way we’ve forgotten we should be designing organizations for the benefit of the human beings in them.

Gradually, then suddenly

This is something that happens to firms over time. Seth Godin used the phrase “gradually and then suddenly” to describe “how companies die, how brands wither.”

“…every day opportunities are missed, little bits of value are lost, customers become unentranced. We don’t notice so much, because hey, there’s a profit. Profit covers many sins. Of course, one day, once the foundation is rotted and the support is gone, so is the profit. Suddenly, apparently quite suddenly, it all falls apart.

It didn’t happen suddenly, you just noticed it suddenly.”

Something we can all do

Caring enough to contribute & connect

Caring enough to contribute & connect

Luckily, caring at work doesn’t have to come from the HR department or the CEO. Although the place I work in has a lot in common with other large firms, every day I get to see a bit of magic from individuals on our collaboration platform. Without changing the furniture, we’ve created the best office design for people caring and wanting to work together. It’s a virtual place that, unlike most office space, is people-centered. It’s a space where people say:

“it’s easier to connect with people.”

“you can bring your full self to work” 

“it allows people to show their humor and warmth”

Amidst the usual corporate systems and processes, we have people who care. They’re Working Out Loud, actively trying to make work better. They’re pointing out #brokenwindows and offering solutions. They’re celebrating the work of others (especially on #thankyouthursdays). Our streams are full of people leading with generosity and contribution – and they care even more as a result.

“Being able to help someone you haven’t met or who is very far away is amazing.”

Whether or not you have such a platform, you can have some of these experiences. They all start with individuals caring enough to participate, connect, and use the voice they have for something positive. The medium for that can be your next email, your next meeting, or your next trip in the elevator.

Gradually, then suddenly. Seth Godin noted that the process can work for good, too.

“The flipside works the same way. Trust is earned, value is delivered, concepts are learned. Day by day we improve and build an asset, but none of it seems to be paying off. Until one day, quite suddenly, we become the ten-year overnight success.

This is the way it works, but we too often make the mistake of focusing on the ‘suddenly’ part. The media writes about suddenly, we notice suddenly, we talk about suddenly.

That doesn’t mean that gradually isn’t important. In fact, it’s the only part you can actually do something about.”

Just as things can decay, things can change for the better for you and for your firm. It can start with you, caring enough to contribute and connect.

A different kind of corporate networking event

Old-fashioned networking

Old-fashioned networking

There we were, over 100 of us, gathered at a networking event. And it struck me that people have been holding these kinds of events, in the same format, for perhaps 50 or even 100 years. 

Groups of 10 sat at large round tables and listened to a panel talk about their networking experiences. Then the people at each table introduced themselves and discussed a few questions. Some people handed out business cards before they left.

True, we did meet some people and we did talk about networking. But we didn’t actually change how people develop relationships or make any meaningful connections.

 “There has got to be a better way,” I thought.

“How did you get your current job?”

One of the questions we discussed was “How did you get your current job?” And the answers underscored how most people take a scattershot approach to networking and really do play career roulette.

A recent finance graduate, for example, happened to attend our company’s event on campus and wound up in an arcane business area. Another person’s company was acquired and so now she had a new boss at a new firm. My favorite was an experienced person whose prior business was shut down. He got his current job after bumping into an old acquaintance at a bar. 

Old Acquaintance: “What are you up to?”  

Experienced Person: “I’m looking for something new.”

Old Acquaintance: “Oh, I think a friend of mine is hiring at his firm. Are you interested?”

Experienced Person (to the table): “So I sent him a note, and here I am.”

Everyone agreed that building a network is important and they all wanted to do something about it. But what?

The same themes, over and over and over

As people described their experiences with networking, the common theme seemed to be frustration:

“I don’t have any time.”

“I don’t know what to do.”

“I know I should follow up but I don’t.” 

Ironically, the event just increased their frustration. It further reinforced what they already knew (“I should be networking more!”) without providing them with a better way of doing it. After the event, everyone would still struggle with time, technique, and a lack of a system or new habits.

That motivated me to make some simple adjustments to the next event I’d participate in.

5 ways to make networking events better

The best networking experiences I’ve ever been a part of are dinners hosted by Keith Ferrazzi. Aside from the food and drink, the venue and the small tables designed to promote better interactions, he also gets people to know and care about each other. And he does that by sharing personal information and asking probing questions. At one of his dinners, you can do more than meet people. You can make friends for life.

What if our corporate networking events were more like that? Even if you can’t control the food, the venue, or the tables, here are 5 simple things you can do to make networking events better.

  1. Prepare rich profiles: Prepare in-depth profiles of everyone in the room, including links to their LinkedIn pages or other public profiles. 
  2. Ask humanizing questions: In the profile, include questions such as “What are you passionate about?” and “What’s your superpower?” to avoid people simply providing their corporate title and work history. Provide a real example of an interesting profile.
  3. Allow time to explore: Share the profiles ahead of time so everyone can look for people they’d like to meet at the event. Make sure they can access the profiles during the event, too, and give them time to browse.
  4. Offer helpful nudges: At least one person should be a designated match-maker, making introductions based on things they’ve noticed from carefully reviewing all of the profiles. (“You two were both in the Peace Corps! You should definitely know each other.”
  5. Build in a little structure: Help people with follow-ups by structuring specific actions into the event. It could be “Make 3 new LinkedIn connections during the event”. (Or, better yet, use your company’s social platform if you have one.) Or “Schedule a lunch & 2 coffees before the night is over.” 

Next time, instead of having everyone just talk about networking, make sure they can actually practice it.

What do you think? What made your great networking experiences great? What would you do to make your next event better?

Working Out Loud in Berlin

Brandenburg Gate in Berlin

Brandenburg Gate in Berlin

I’m sitting on a plane heading back to NY, reading notes from 70+ people about working out loud.

I met those people at the Social Business Collaboration Summit in Berlin. There, with attendees from companies as diverse as IKEA, KPMG, and Asian Paints, I got the chance to ask:

“Did they see the benefits of working out loud?”

“Were they having difficulties helping people at their firms change how they work?”

Here’s what they said.

The easy part: benefits

Contributions during the World Cafe

Contributions during the World Cafe

Groups of 15 or so convened for 30 minutes each in a World Cafe format. After a brief description of working out loud – “making your work visible and narrating your work in progress” – each group quickly listed a series of benefits:

  • makes it easier to spot duplication and identify collaboration opportunities
  • improves quality and timeliness by getting feedback in the early stages of work
  • makes it easier to discover and develop knowledge and expertise
  • helps teams, particularly global teams, feel closer
  • helps break silos and connect the dots across teams
  • fosters innovation by allowing more people to use knowledge in different ways
  • gives people control of their reputation and taps into intrinsic motivation

One woman, with a lovely accent and a sense of the poetic, added “it helps your work develop new routes.”

A simple example from IKEA

"Finding competence"

“Finding competence”

A woman in the communications division at IKEA told a story of how working out loud helped her team “find competence in unexpected places.” In her area, people around the world have similar jobs managing their local communications sites. Every month, they’d get on a conference call to share information but it wasn’t very effective. The timezones made the call inconvenient for some. And not everyone was comfortable speaking in English. So the calls were dominated by those most confident and awake.

Then the team decided to augment their calls by using their new social platform. And, all of a sudden, “someone who never said anything on the phone was making all these contributions online.” He shifted from being invisible to “becoming influential and a leader in the group.”

“Great,” I said to the others, “now how many stories do you have like this at your firms?”

An uncomfortable truth

As you might expect, most people at a social business conference are used to working out loud themselves. But the number of people doing so at there firms remains woefully low. Even getting people to simply login to a collaboration platform remains a challenge.

This seemed to be true across industries and cultures. Why? All we had were theories and anecdotes:

“Maybe people are too busy.”

“Maybe they’re uncomfortable talking about their work in public.” 

“Maybe their managers suppress them.” 

“Maybe they’re simply surrounded by people working a certain way and it’s too difficult to work differently.”

“Maybe some people would rather be invisible at work.”

So while more and more companies have social collaboration projects, the pace of change is very, very slow.

Getting started

Evolving the way we work

Evolving the way we work

In answering the question “What can we do?” the groups were both positive and practical. Most agreed that it’s about developing new habits. So that meant using the same techniques that work for changing other habits.

  1. Make it simple. Just changing someone’s home page can make the platform seem much more accessible. And curated suggestions of people, groups, and content relevant to a person’s division and location make the value more apparent.
  2. Start small. Create situations – such as town halls and other events – where people can find material or ask a question and feel the benefits themselves.
  3. Make it safe. Give every team a private online space to make posting seem less risky.
  4. Leverage social influence. Spend more effort on getting influential people, especially senior management, to model the behavior.
  5. Make it relevant. Provide more content and more integration with daily processes so it’s part of the daily work and not yet another thing to do.

Are we there yet?

After a few years of attending conferences like this one in Berlin, we’ve moved from just talking about the possibilities to having firms of all kinds actively working to change things. We’ve enabled a first wave of experimentation and have our first meaningful sets of stories across a wide range of companies. But how long will it take until a critical mass of people in large firms of working differently?

Later in the week, at a meet-up of early adopters in Frankfurt, I said I thought it would take 3-5 years. When I asked people in the room what they thought, the majority said “a generation.”

Time to get back to work.

The doctor at the fast food convention

Really?

Really?

Can you imagine being a doctor at a fast food convention, trying to change the way people eat? Even if the attendees know the food is bad for them, they’ll be surrounded by it and by other people who eagerly eat it, so they’ll eat it too.

To try to help them, you’ll race around frantically, telling them about the benefits of eating right and exercising. Some will nod their heads. “Yes, we really should.” Then they’ll go back to doing what they usually do.

That’s what it can feel like when you talk about making work better in large companies.

Most people know there are better ways of working. They know their daily practices aren’t good for them. They know they’re not engaged. But for most of them it just feels too difficult to change.

So what do you do? Give up on all those unfulfilled people?

The Work Revolution Summit

Yesterday, I was fortunate to be admitted to the Work Revolution Summit where I could  “join leading entrepreneurs, startup investors, futurists, organizational designers, and technology experts to fundamentally re-design the way we work.”

theworkrevolution

One of the organizers was Jessica Lawrence, who is both former CEO of the Girl Scouts and organizer of the NY Tech Meetup for entrepreneurs. One of the objectives of the summit was to help start-ups maintain “a ‘human’ company culture that helps both the employees and the company reach their full potential as the organization grows and scales.” And Jessica gave a fascinating talk about trying to change the culture while she was CEO.

There were several other great speakers, including Seth Godin. And I got to ask him a question about what to do when your are, in essence, a doctor at the fast food convention.

A question for Seth Godin

Seth GodinSeth Godin’s daily blog has done more to change how I approach work than anything else. And each time I hear him speak, I’m inspired to do more. This time, I had the chance the to ask him “What do you do when you’re preaching change and and it seems like only a small minority is interested in actually changing?”

He told me something that I know is right but I’ve had trouble putting into practice. Don’t preach to everybody. Don’t try to reach everybody. Many people are simply trying to hold onto their job and it’s too scary/hard/uncomfortable for them to do something different. Instead, find the people who are ready and eager for change. Connect them to build a tribe who wants to change. And equip and empower that tribe to extend the movement (giving them credit and control when they do).

A shift in tactics

The first NYC Marathon in 1970

The first NYC Marathon in 1970

I was 6 years old when the first NYC Marathon took place in 1970. Only 127 people ran that race. Only 55 finished. And about 100 people watched. No one I knew heard of it. No one I knew ran at all. At the time, running a marathon seemed ridiculous.

41 years later, almost 47,000 people finished and almost 2 million people lined up along the route. It’s become the largest marathon anywhere in the world. And even I completed one.

Running marathons didn’t spread because Fred Lebow, the original organizer, went around telling everyone about the benefits of running. Instead, all 6 sources of influence came into play. Over time, there was more help to get you started and more motivation at the personal, social, and structural levels. More running books, more equipment, more races, more clubs, more visible rewards.  Over the course of a generation, more and more people just did it.

Growth of a tribe

Growth of a tribe

So of course changing how people work isn’t simply about telling people. We’ll have to keep making it easier to work out loud. Keep writing about it and teaching it. Keep connecting advocates and equipping them to extend their own networks.

Just now, I joined the work revolution where I pledged “I will do whatever I can within my sphere of influence to promote workplaces that are profoundly human and deeply meaningful.”

It may take a generation, but we need to keep running.

Why I wear a pink shirt on Thursdays

A small gesture

A small gesture

My friend’s father has been a hostage for over 6 years. In a few months, he’ll be the longest-held international hostage in American history. And you probably don’t know his name.

He is Bob Levinson. I work with his daughter, Sarah. And this is a story about little things, big things, and something beautiful that exists inside even the largest corporations.

Pink Shirt Thursdays

For years, Sarah’s family has been trying to raise awareness so someone will act to free her father. Bob was working in Iran when he was kidnapped and, since then, there have been occasional videos and reports so they know he’s alive. (You can read more details here.)

In the 1990s, when her father worked in Miami, he started a tradition of wearing pink shirts on Thursdays and ultimately the entire office did it. So Sarah decided to try and get people at our office to do it, too.

“The goal is to get as many people as possible to start wearing pink shirts regularly on Thursday and then publicize that to whoever might listen. It would be great if we could even ask people to post pictures of their teams wearing their pink shirts…so I can collect and share all the images”

Then Sarah sent me a note asking if I would write a blog about it on our social platform at work.

Would it matter?

I used to think small gestures didn’t matter. When I’d see people raising money with bake sales and the like, I’d think “you’d be better off just writing a check.” My cynicism would be piqued on seeing people changing their avatars or re-tweeting expressions of support. And writing a blog post seemed trivial compared to the gravity of her father’s situation.

But what I completely overlooked is the value of solidarity. The value of someone doing something, even a small something, for someone else.

A little thing like choosing a certain shirt color on Thursday could lift someone’s spirits for a moment, or even a day. Collectively, we could give Sarah and her family a story for a lifetime. And each time someone mentioned our pink shirt, we could tell them the story of Bob Levinson.

What happened next

Help Bob LevinsonSo I wrote a short blog post. At first, there were a few initial comments of support. Then, the following Thursday, a woman in Germany posted the first photo of herself in a pink shirt. Then another person posted and soon came the first team photo. Word was starting to spread.

“Let’s turn this place pink!” someone commented.

Within a few weeks, there have been almost 5000 views and 200 comments. Photos of more and more teams from around the world all wearing pink. Of the catering staff in pink. Of families in pink. Even someone on holiday got their group of 18 people to all wear pink.

And in addition to the photos, people began sharing their own stories of loss and solidarity. They were expressing their support for Sarah and her family as well as their sense of connection with each other, of our shared humanity even in the workplace.

“I can’t even begin to understand what you and your family must be going through, but what I can do is get involved, show support and help raise awareness.”

“…it has certainly made me more aware of my colleagues and how we can support each other”

“It was with enormous joy that I have read every caring post in this campaign. This is one of those moments when I feel very proud of working here”

Sarah posted a collage on her family’s Facebook group “Help Bob Levinson” and keeps thanking people on our platform at work.

“It means so much to keep seeing this sea of pink shirts on Thursdays.”

Yes, it matters

Support matters

Support matters

The week I wrote the post, wondering if it would make a difference, my 3 year old son broke his arm. We rushed to the emergency room and, after 15 stressful hours, he had surgery. When friends and family found out, they sent me messages of support and best wishes for a successful recovery. They commented on Facebook. And while those messages didn’t help Hudson’s arm hurt less or heal any faster, they absolutely helped me and my wife. Knowing other people cared made a difference.

When I look at Sarah’s Facebook page, the stories her family shares are so bittersweet. There are wonderful memories coupled with the pain of loss and what might have been. I also see the support from a network of thousands of people. And that matters.

So I wear a pink shirt on Thursdays, sending Sarah my own message that I care and wish her the best. And that I hope her dad is safely home very, very soon.